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James Garcia
James Garcia

A Journey Into Yin Yoga



In A Journey Into Yin Yoga, world-renowned yoga instructor Travis Eliot guides you through this contemporary and effective approach for strengthening the mind, body, and spirit. You will learn about the origins and practice of yin yoga, a challenging approach in which poses are held for several minutes to target the connective tissues of the hips, pelvis, and lower spine. You will learn to help clients mindfully transition between poses and gently allow tissues to stretch, facilitating better circulation and joint health for your clients and improving their flexibility. Throughout, you will learn the benefits, contraindications, alignment points, and modifications so you can adjust the poses for different needs and body types.




A Journey Into Yin Yoga



A Journey Into Yin Yoga presents over 50 yin yoga poses with stunning photos and detailed instruction, along with inspiring quotes, stories, and interviews from celebrities, athletes, and health professionals. You will be inspired to discover the unique path to improved mental and physical strength and balance. Certified professionals can confidently apply the concepts to their clients and, with the CE exam, pursue continuing education credits in the process.


Travis Eliot is a world-renowned yoga instructor, meditation teacher, kirtan musician, and certified Ayurveda practitioner. He is the CEO of Inner Domain Media, director of Holistic Yoga Flow teacher trainings, and a member of the faculty of the prestigious Kripalu Center and the 1440 Multiversity. He teaches his signature holistic yoga flow classes in Los Angeles and in workshops and retreats around the world with an intensely dynamic style that has inspired many of today's top athletes, celebrities, and entertainers.


This is an amazing Yoga course. The book delves into the history and philosophy of Yoga and how Taoism has influenced the development of Yin Yoga, which brings more meaning to the poses and sequences. The pictures and pose explanations clearly illustrate the correct form for the poses. And there are many helpful sample sequences to get you started. The exam covered many of the most pertinent facts and ideas. I highly recommend this course to any yoga enthusiast or beginning student. Well done!


Join world-renowned yoga instructor Travis Eliot as he guides you through this contemporary and effective approach for strengthening your mind, body, and spirit. You will learn about the origins and practice of yin yoga, a passive approach in which poses are held for a few minutes to target the connective tissues of the hips, pelvis, and lower spine. You will slowly and mindfully transition between poses as you gently allow those tissues to stretch, facilitating better circulation and joint health and improving flexibility. Throughout, you will learn the benefits, contraindications, alignment points, and modifications so you can adjust the poses to your needs and body type.


A Journey Into Yin Yoga presents 46 yin yoga poses with stunning photos and detailed instruction, along with inspiring quotes, stories, and interviews from celebrities, doctors, and athletes. You will be inspired to discover your unique path to improved mental and physical strength and balance.


A Journey Into Yin Yoga presents over 50 yin yoga poses with stunning photos and detailed instruction, along with inspiring quotes, stories, and interviews from celebrities, doctors, and athletes. You will be inspired to discover your unique path to improved mental and physical strength and balance.


Michelle Pietrzak-Wegner, C-IAYT, E-RYT 500, is a Phoenix Rising Yoga Therapist, Yin Yoga training facilitator, and graduate student in clinical counseling. She offers yoga programs in Asia and the United States.


Yin Yoga is slow-paced style of yoga as exercise, incorporating principles of traditional Chinese medicine, with asanas (postures) that are held for longer periods of time than in other styles. Advanced practitioners may stay in one asana for five minutes or more. The sequences of postures are meant to stimulate the channels of the subtle body known as meridians in Chinese medicine and as nadis in Hatha yoga.


Yin Yoga was founded in the late 1970s by martial arts expert and Taoist yoga teacher Paulie Zink. Yin Yoga is taught across North America and Europe, encouraged by its teachers Paul Grilley and Sarah Powers. As taught by Grilley and Powers, it is not intended as a complete practice in itself, but as a complement to more active forms of yoga and exercise. However, Zink's approach includes the full range of Taoist yoga, both yin and conventional.


The practice of a series of long-held floor poses was introduced in North America in the late 1970s by the martial arts champion Paulie Zink.[6][7][8][9][10][11]In the late 1970s, Zink began to teach a synthesis of hatha yoga with Taoist yoga, as well as postures, movements and insights that he had developed himself. He later called this synthesis "Yin and Yang yoga," or "Yin Yoga" for short.[12][13][14][15]


The yoga teacher Paul Grilley sought Zink out and studied with him in the 1980s.[16][17][18] Grilley studied anatomy in Montana under a doctor, Gary Parker, and then at the University of California, Los Angeles. There, he also taught conventional yoga including Ashtanga and Bikram Yoga, and managed a yoga studio.[19] In 1989, Grilley met Hiroshi Motoyama, a Japanese scholar and yoga practitioner,[16] who had researched the physiology of Traditional Chinese Medicine and written on it extensively.[20] Motoyama was interested in the physiology of the meridians, or subtle pathways and vessels, and the qi or subtle energy hypothesized to flow through or get stored in them. These are fundamental concepts in Chinese medicine and acupuncture. He related these to the parallel concepts of the nadi pathways and chakras of Indian yoga, and the prana said to be carried within them.[21] Grilley began to teach a fusion of the Yin poses he had learned from Zink with hatha yoga and anatomy, and the teachings of Motoyama.[22][16] He created yin sequences with aims similar to that of an acupuncturist.[16] Yin teacher and author Ulrica Norberg says that Grilley "evolved Yin Yoga further."[23] Bernie Clark, a Yin Yoga author and teacher[24] said that Grilley's synthesis of anatomy, Taoist Yoga, and meridian theory "resonated with many people who recognized the benefits of the practice and related to Paul's model of the body/mind/soul."[22]


One of Grilley's students, the yoga teacher Sarah Powers, began teaching yoga in his style. She incorporated Buddhist psychology and put more emphasis on targeting the meridian systems for health and enlightenment. Her book, Insight Yoga, explains Yin Yoga sequences designed to enhance the flow of qi as understood in Traditional Chinese Medicine.[25] She emphasized a conscious and systematic approach to breathing during yin practice.[26] Grilley had at first called his approach Taoist Yoga, in deference to Zink's term. Powers, noting that the yoga she and Grilley were teaching was different from Zink's, suggested the term Yin Yoga. Zink adopted the term as a short form for "Yin and Yang Yoga."[27] Powers began teaching Yin Yoga in her tours,[28] referring students to Grilley for further information. Powers, Grilley, and Zink began offering Yin Yoga teacher training courses. By 2009, Yin Yoga had become available across North America and in Europe.[29][17]


Yin Yoga is based on the Taoist concepts of yin and yang, opposite and complementary principles in nature. Yin could be described as stable, immobile, feminine, passive, cold, and downward moving. Yang is understood to be changing, mobile, masculine, active, hot, and upward moving. The sun is considered yang, the moon yin.[30] In the body, the relatively stiff connective tissues (tendons, ligaments, fascia) are considered yin, while the more mobile and pliable muscles and blood are called yang. More passive asanas in yoga are considered yin, whereas the more active, dynamic asanas are described as yang.[16]


Yin Yoga employs specific sequences of poses to stimulate particular meridians, or subtle channels, as understood in Traditional Chinese Medicine; these are the equivalent of the nadi channels in hatha yoga.[31]


Although many Yin Yoga poses closely resemble the asanas of conventional or "yang" yoga, they have different names, in part to alert those familiar with conventional yoga not to perform them in the same way.[30] In general, the poses of Yin Yoga are performed with little muscular exertion. For example, in Seal pose, in which a practitioner lies face down and raises the trunk, the upward movement is gradual and entirely supported by the arms, while the legs are relaxed, whereas in Bhujangasana (Cobra Pose), the practitioner actively curves the spine upward in an arc using arms and lower back muscles, and reaches back with the legs strongly.[16] Because Yin Yoga does not make practitioners hot, the temperature of the room is kept a little higher than usual.[33]


Journey into Yoga School of Yoga offers workshops, retreats, and trainings worldwide. We provide a safe, loving and nurturing environment for participants to dive into your own personal and spiritual journey. Our compassionate approach encourages self acceptance and invites you to meet the moment fully and meet it as a friend. 041b061a72


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